<th id="izpf2"></th><input id="izpf2"><output id="izpf2"><strike id="izpf2"></strike></output></input>
    <input id="izpf2"></input>
  • 湖南快乐十分湖南快乐十分官网湖南快乐十分网址湖南快乐十分注册湖南快乐十分app湖南快乐十分平台湖南快乐十分邀请码湖南快乐十分网登录湖南快乐十分开户湖南快乐十分手机版湖南快乐十分app下载湖南快乐十分ios湖南快乐十分可靠吗
         
       
     
       
    Projects    
         
    ? AoE Project
    ? West River Project
     
    AoE (fifth round) Scheme: Historical Anthropology of Chinese Society
    About the Project
    “The Historical Anthropology of Chinese Society”, a research project organised by members of the Departments of History and of Cultural and Religious Studies, was awarded an Areas of Excellence (AoE) grant by the University Grants Committee. This was the first ever humanities research project in Hong Kong to have been awarded a grant under the AoE Scheme.

    The project is directed by Professor David Faure of the Department of History, and conducted by a team of internationally reputable researchers based in Hong Kong, Mainland China and the United States. It explores variations in Chinese local society within the rubric of a unified Chinese culture, and studies fifteen geographic areas in China to recover the history of both how local society acquired and identified with its own characteristics, and incorporated into, and accepted, the broad expanse of the unified culture. It will document observable indications of local ritual traditions and reconstruct the history of the local institutions in which they are employed.

    The project is the joint undertaking of CUHK’s History Department, the South China Research Center in the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and the Centre for Historical Anthropology in Sun Yat-sen University, the last having been a Ministry of Education (MoE) Key Research Institute of Humanities and Social Science since 2004.

    [More information]

       

    Advisors and Committee

    External Advisors
    Prof. Michio Suenari (The University of Tokyo & Toyo University)
    Prof. Myron Cohen (Columbia University)
    Prof. Susan Naquin (Princeton University)
       
    Internal Supervisory Committee
    Prof. Benjamin W. Wah, Provost (Chairman)
    Prof. Henry N.C. Wong, Pro-Vice-Chancellor
    Prof. Hsiung Ping-chen, Dean of Arts
    Prof. David Faure, Wei Lun Professor of History
       
    Research Team
    Prof. David Faure (Principal Investigator & Project Director) (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Prof. Liu Tik-sang (Principal Investigator) (The Hong Kong University of Science & Technology)
    Prof. Liu Zhiwei (Principal Investigator) (Sun Yat-sen University)
    Prof. Chen Chunsheng (Sun Yat-sen University)
    Prof. Cheung Siu-woo (The Hong Kong University of Science & Technology)
    Prof. Cheung Sui Wai (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Prof. Choi Chi-cheung (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Prof. He Xi (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Prof. John Lagerwey (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Prof. Ma Jiangxiong (The Hong Kong University of Science & Technology)
    Prof. Puk Wing Kin (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Prof. Helen F. Siu (Yale University)
    Prof. So Kee Long (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Prof. Tam Wai Lun (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Prof. Zhao Shiyu (Peking University)
    Dr. Chen Lihua (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
    Dr. Xie Xiaohui (The Hong Kong University of Science & Technology)
     
    Top
     
    Redefining the West River: Ming and Qing State Building and the Transformation of Native Society
    About the Project

    The West River project, under its full title “Redefining the West River: Ming and Qing State Building and the Transformation of Native Society” is a three-year project (2006/07-2009/10) based at the Chinese University of Hong Kong funded by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

    In this project, we propose that the West River basin can be looked upon as the result of repeated administrative and ritual changes spreading over much of China in different historical periods. Guided by this hypothesis, we seek to reconstruct locality-specific chronological developments of ritual and social changes, and to compare these developmental progressions in the light of known patterns from parts of China which have been well documented, notably the Pearl River delta and Putian, Fujian province. The ritual repertoire that forms the basis of our study includes a bundle of administrative, architectural and ritual markers related to temples and graves: the coincidence of gods and ancestors, the location of graves and related sacrificial halls, the existence or otherwise of the architectural feature related to the “family temple” (jiamiao), the use of written genealogies, agencies involved in the ownership of land, award of degrees through imperial examinations, and the presence or otherwise of various priestly orders in the performance of rituals. By demonstrating that these markers vary systematically in relation to the integration of the locality into the Chinese state at specific historical time, we argue that variations in local culture can be explained as the results of different patterns of negotiation between local society and the state in ritual terms.

        Top
    湖南快乐十分{{转码主词}官网{{转码主词}网址